Manila to take brunt of Typhoon Rammasun’s flooding rain, wind

In the western Pacific, Typhoon Rammasun, locally named Glenda, is producing flooding rainfall and damaging winds along its track across the Philippines.

Manila to take brunt of Typhoon Rammasun’s flooding rain, wind

In the western Pacific, Typhoon Rammasun, locally named Glenda, is producing flooding rainfall and damaging winds along its track across the Philippines.

Rammasun strengthened to a typhoon on Monday under favorable environmental conditions of warm ocean water temperatures (30-31°C or 86-88°F) and generally low wind shear.

Rammasun continued to strengthen into Tuesday with peak winds around 115 mph when the cyclone made landfall in southeast Luzon.

Damaging winds and flooding rainfall are expected to continue across the north-central and northern Philippines as Rammasun moves across the island nation Tuesday night into Wednesday.

Impacts from Rammasun are already being felt across the western Philippines Tuesday night, local time, as outer bands of rain have already lashed Manila with 25-75 mm (1-3 inches) of rain.

The heaviest rainfall so far has totaled 150-250 mm (6-10 inches) across parts of Samar Island, in northern Visayas and southeast Luzon. Some of the hardest hit areas include Legaspi, Catarman and Catbalogan.

The greatest impacts will continue across northern Visayas and southern Luzon, close to the storm track. Heavy rain will total 100-200 mm (4-8 inches) along and near the track of the storm, including Manila where flooding will be a serious concern. Local rainfall amounts over 300 mm (12 inches) are possible.

Latest eTN Podcast

Wind gusts over 105 kph (65 mph) are expected with isolated gusts up to 160 kph (100 mph) close to the storm track. Areas around Metro Manila are expected to be hardest hit by the typhoon on Wednesday as the center passes within 30 miles of the city causing widespread wind damage.

When crossing the Philippines, Rammasun is expected to weaken due to the interaction with land but is expected to remain a typhoon as it emerges back over the open waters of the South China Sea on Wednesday. The typhoon will then move west-northwest across the South China Sea taking the cyclone near Hainan by Friday.

Moving over another area of very warm waters and low to moderate shear will give Rammasun the opportunity to further strengthen as it approaches China.

Late in the week, Rammasun will then bring the threat for flooding rains and damaging winds to southern China with the greatest impacts likely in Hainan, southern Guangdong and southern Guangxi provinces.

Rammasun will then track into northern Vietnam where it will quickly weaken this weekend. Even though it will weaken after making landfall, widespread flooding is expected across southern China and northern Vietnam. Mudslides will also be a major concern as the storm moves into an area of more rugged terrain.

Another tropical disturbance, currently to the southwest of Guam, could target the northern Philippines early next week.

Fill out my online form.
CATEGORIES
Follow on Feedly