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Nordstrom is teaching shoppers how to make face masks

Nordstrom Department Stores producing Facemarks

Nordstrom is teaching shoppers how to make face masks

Pete and Erik Nordstrom are the owners of Nordstrom department stores. Their 379 department stores in the United States are closed, but the alteration department are producing and donating facemasks needed to fight coronavirus. In addition, Nordstrom is teaching its clients how to produce masks. Peter and Erik Nordstroms are today’s eTN heroes.

Nordstrom is an American luxury department store chain founded in 1901 by John W. Nordstrom and Carl F. Wallin. It originated as a shoe store and evolved into a full-line retailer with departments for clothing, footwear, handbags, jewelry, accessories, cosmetics, and fragrances.

The Nordstrom Department store at Ala Moana Shopping Center in Honolulu is across the street from eTurboNews and closed like almost every store in the largest shopping Center in Hawaii.

Pete and Erik Nordstrom wrote today:  In this time of great need, we’re also looking for unique ways to help others in our communities. For example, we’re leveraging our Alterations teams in Washington, Oregon, Texas, and California to sew more than 100,000 masks that will be distributed to Providence Health & Services. We’re also continuing to support our partners providing critical services to those impacted by COVID-19.

Nordstrom gives an option on teaching how to fabricate masks and how to donate them. Click here to find out more.

Mr. Nordstom writes: I hope you are staying well during this time of uncertainty. As we shared earlier this month, we made the decision to temporarily close all our U.S. and Canada stores, including Nordstrom, Nordstrom Rack, Trunk Club, Jeffrey, Nordstrom Local and Last Chance locations for two weeks to help do our part to slow the spread of COVID-19. We will extend this temporary closure for at least another week, through April 5. It’s clear the situation is evolving, and at this time we don’t know for certain how long our stores will be closed.

This situation has real impacts on our employees, and we continue to do what we can to best take care of them. We’ve continued to provide pay since our stores first closed and will do that for another week, through April 5. Benefits will continue for our store employees through April. We’re connecting with each of them to ensure they have the resources they need to support themselves and their families. If you’d like to learn more about our approach, you can read our email to all Nordstrom employees here.

In this time of great need, we’re also looking for unique ways to help others in our communities. For example, we’re leveraging our Alterations teams in Washington, Oregon, Texas and California to sew more than 100,000 masks that will be distributed to Providence Health & Services. We’re also continuing to support our partners providing critical services to those impacted by COVID-19. Y ou can visit our Nordstrom Now blog to see more on all our efforts and how you can help.


Until we can reopen our doors, we’re focused on serving you online, whether that’s on Nordstrom.com, Nordstromrack.com, Trunkclub.com or our apps. We are deeply grateful for the dedication and resilience of our employees who make our ecommerce business possible, and we are doing everything we can to keep them safe and healthy.

Nordstrom producing masks and teaching their clients on how to join in

Pete Nordstrom

In 1887, John W. Nordstrom, at 16 years old, left Sweden for the United States. He arrived in New York with $5 in his pocket, unable to speak a word of English.

The young immigrant labored in mines and logging camps as he crossed the country to California and Washington. In 1897, he headed north to Alaska and the Klondike in search of gold. Two years later, he returned to Seattle with a $13,000 stake, ready to settle down.

Carl F. Wallin, a Seattle shoemaker Nordstrom had met in Alaska, offered him a partnership in a shoe store. In 1901, they opened their first store, Wallin & Nordstrom, on Fourth and Pike in Seattle.

The business grew and, in 1923, the partners added a second store in Seattle’s University District.

In 1928, John retired and sold his share of the company to his sons Everett and Elmer. Carl Wallin retired a year later and also sold his share to the Nordstrom sons. John’s third son, Lloyd, joined the team in 1933.

Today, Pete and Erik Nordstrom serve as co-presidents of Nordstrom, Inc., and manage the company along with the executive team. From one tiny shoe store, Nordstrom has grown into a leading fashion retailer with global reach. It offers an unparalleled selection of shoes, clothing, accessories, home goods, and gifts—and an extensive range of services to make shopping fun, personalized and convenient.

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