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The EI Advantage: How Four Seasons drives innovation and business success

The EI Advantage: How Four Seasons drives innovation and business success

Companies that ignore emotional intelligence will have challenges attracting new talent, degrade their workplace culture and risk falling behind in the economy of the future says new global study by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services.

A global study by Harvard Business Review Analytic Services and presented by Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts calls for a corporate culture transformation driven by the power of emotional intelligence (EI). For many years, EI has been the cornerstone of empowered, engaged and energetic corporate cultures. Yet the study outlines a troubling trend: companies worldwide are underestimating the value of EI, and there is a growing disconnect between what executives are saying about the importance of company culture and what they are actually doing.

Emotional intelligence is a combination of self-awareness, self-control, empathy and social skills. It is the bedrock of deep personal relationships and fosters an environment wherein employees can innovate, solve problems and feel empowered to serve as ambassadors for their brand. Nonetheless, EI is often downplayed as a ‘nice-to-have’ soft skill when compared to others skills such as mental toughness, drive and analytical ability.

Four Seasons has long celebrated the importance of EI in building its world-renowned service culture and is internationally recognized as an employer of choice, including having been named a “Great Place to Work Legend”. Inspired by this legacy, Four Seasons sponsored the HBR-AS study to elevate the discourse around corporate culture and champion the “EI Advantage” as an important driver of company culture innovation.

“Long before the term emotional intelligence was coined, Four Seasons Founder and Chairman Isadore Sharpunderstood that empathetic, self-aware employees would build a sustainable competitive advantage in a fiercely competitive industry,” says Christian Clerc, President, Worldwide Hotel Operations, Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts.

“Change is hard, and cultural change is even harder,” continues Clerc. “More than ever, customers are seeking connections with the companies who serve them, and emotionally intelligent employees are the key to delivering an authentic customer experience. For companies to succeed, they must keep pace with social change and the expectations of new generations. They must have a purpose that extends beyond financial goals, and a work environment that brings out the best in its people. In this context, prioritizing emotional intelligence represents nothing less than the evolution of the modern workplace.”

The study takes a close look at EI in the workplace to better understand the gap between theory and practice, as well as the reasons why some organizations embrace EI skills and why others dismiss it as a ‘soft skill’. Mastery of EI skills has become more critical as employees, particularly those on the front lines, make decisions that can materially impact a brand’s reputation and its connection to customers – for better or worse.

“Companies love to talk about the importance of their people and the strength of their human-centric workplace, yet many fail to promote EI among their leaders and their workforce,” says Alex Clemente, managing director, HBR-AS. “This research shows that many companies struggle to champion EI and reap the myriad benefits for their organizations – including happier, motivated, and effective employees. Even more, employers wanting to create the workplace of the future – the one that millennials are demanding – must understand that ignoring EI not only has grave impact on their human capital, but ultimately on their future success.”

To read more about Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts visit here.

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