Thailand: The 1,000 Spire Pagoda

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Tourists in Thailand visiting Ko Khao Yai at Ban Bo Chet Luk, which is part of the Ko Phetra National Park of Satun province, will be greeted by a mass of nearly a thousand bizarre-looking spire-like rocks. This spectacular site is like a bridge connecting us to the pre-human evolutionary age. During the summer low tides, the seawater recedes below the sandy ground revealing gigantic tunnel-like cavities. To the locals, this mass of rocks is known as ‘The 1,000-Spire Pagoda’.

The presence of reddish Cambrian sedimentary rocks and grey Ordovician limestone has convinced geologists to speculate that this area could have been the first landmass of Thailand. Thanks to this unique feature, Ko Khao Yai became Thailand’s first geological site to be declared a UNESCO World Geological Site.

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Ko Khao Yai’s tourism is community-managed.  Local residents proposed ideas, implemented them and designed tourism programmes that conform to their original way of life. Today, the ‘1,000-Spire Pagoda’ is amongst Thailand’s most perfectly conserved natural attractions. An ideal site for studies in geology, natural history and cultural anthropology, Ko Khao Yai is a piece of well-recorded evidence of sub-oceanic conditions of 500 million years ago.

“The Seasons Episode 6: The Ancient Stone” is part of the 12- episode travel documentary series that reveal the untold stories of the unique way of life of the Thai people and the amazing scenery of natural attractions in different regions. There are four episodes for each of the three seasons that Thailand has in a year: rainy, cool and summer.