Iran Aseman Flight 3704 crashed in Semirom, Isfahan Province Iran

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Iran Aseman Flight 3704 crashed today with 60 people on board. This Iranian plane with went down near the city of Semirom in the Isfahan Province of Iran, according to Tasnim news agency citing Iran’s emergency center. The aircraft went off radar midflight from Tehran to Yasuj.

Iran Aseman Airlines also known as Aseman, is an airline headquartered in Tehran, Iran. It operates scheduled domestic passenger services and regional international services. Aseman is Iran’s third-largest airline by active fleet size .

The airline was established and started operations in 1980.The airline’s historic links go back to 1958 to the airline Air Taxi Co., which was rebranded as Pars Air in the 1970s and later Iran Aseman Airlines.

In March 2007, it was owned by Iranian Civil Pension Fund Investment Company and had 298 employees. It has since been privatized.

In July 2016, the CEO of the airline was issued an arrest warrant because of an alleged sum of approximately $37 million in public debts to Iran Airports & Air Navigation Company.

Semirom is located about 80 km north from Yasuj, the capital of the south-western Kohgiluyeh and Boyer-Ahmad Province.

Pir-Hossein Koulivand, the head of Iran’s Emergency Medical Services, said the plane had crashed in Semirom in the central Isfahan province, only 185.2 kilometers (113 miles) before reaching Yasuj, the Islamic Republic of Iran News Network reported.

  • On 4 October 1990, an Iran Aseman Fokker F27 Friendship (registration EP-ANA) overran the runway upon landing at Ramsar Airport, Iran and came to rest at a concrete wall 100 metres behind the runway. There were no fatalities amongst the 46 passengers and 4 crew members on board, and the aircraft was fully repaired.[10]
  • On 12 October 1994, Iran Aseman Airlines Flight 746, a Fokker F28 Fellowship (registration EP-PAV) en route from Isfahan to Tehran suffered a sudden loss of power in both engines at 23:05 local time, 35 minutes after take-off from Isfahan International Airport. The aircraft spiralled into an uncontrolled descent and crashed near Natanz, killing all 59 passengers and 7 crew members on board.[11]
  • On 18 July 2000, Iran Aseman Airlines Flight 775, a Fokker F28 Fellowship (registration EP-PAU) en route from Tehran to Ahwaz, was damaged beyond repair when the pilot missed the runway upon a low-visibility landing attempt at Ahwaz Airport and instead touched down next to it. A successful go-around was executed, and there were no injuries amongst the 84 passengers and 4 crew members on board/
  • On 26 August 2010, a Fokker 100 (registration EP-ASL) operating Iran Aseman Airlines Flight 773 from Tehran to Tabriz overran the runway upon landing at Tabriz International Airport and was substantially damaged when it plunged into a canal. Two out of the 103 passengers on board were injured, while none of the 7 crew members were hurt.
  • On 10 May 2014, a Fokker 100 (registration EP-ASZ), was damaged in a landing accident at Zahedan Airport (ZAH), Iran. The airplane operated flight 853 from Mashhad Airport (MHD). According to local media the left hand main undercarriage failed to extend or lock prior to landing. A forced landing was carried out on runway 35. The airplane swerved to the left and came to rest 1450 meters (4760 feet) past the runway 35 threshold and 23 meters (75 feet) to the left of the centreline.
  • On 18 February 2018 an ATR 72 Aircraft was flying between Tehran and Yasouge despaired from the radar 50 min after take-ff
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Juergen Thomas Steinmetz has continuously worked in the travel and tourism industry since he was a teenager in Germany (1979), beginning as a travel agent up through today as a publisher of eTurboNews (eTN), one of the world’s most influential and most-read travel and tourism publications. He is also Chairman of ICTP. His experiences include working and collaborating with various national tourism offices and non-governmental organizations, as well as private and non-profit organizations, and in planning, implementing, and quality control of a range of travel and tourism-related activities and programs, including tourism policies and legislation. His major strengths include a vast knowledge of travel and tourism from the point of view of a successful private enterprise owner, superb networking skills, strong leadership, excellent communication skills, strong team player, attention to detail, dutiful respect for compliance in all regulated environments, and advisory skills in both political and non-political arenas with respect to tourism programs, policies, and legislation. He has a thorough knowledge of current industry practices and trends and is a computer and Internet junkie.