What did Hurricane Irma do to Grenada Tourism?

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What did it do to the Island Nation of Grenada? Grenada is also depending on Tourism, known as the Spice Island.

Hurricane Irma devastated many Caribbean island countries. Tourism took a big hit downwards in the Caribbean on it’s course of death and destruction. Tourism was one of the biggest victim so far.

Irma got Grenada people saying:
We stand with all our Caribbean neighbors in this most difficult time  Barbuda StMartin  TurksandCaicos, Virgin Islands among others.

Damages? It did nothing, Irma did not touch Grenada, and the beautiful Caribbean paradise island remain open for business like usual.

Grenada itself was not hit by the terrible hurricane and life is going on the way described on the Pure Grenada tourism portal:

Grenada, Carriacou, Petite Martinique and its dependencies are located in the eastern Caribbean, south of the Windward Islands and 100 miles north of Venezuela. Neighboring islands St. Vincent and the Grenadines lie to the north and Trinidad and Tobago lie to the South.

If you like to spend your time soaking up the sun, swimming in the cool seawater or snorkelling, there’s a lot to choose from in Grenada, Carriacou and Petite Martinique. Grand Anse Beach, boasting a two-mile stretch of white sand and calm sea is a popular choice amongst tourist and locals.. If you’re looking for a bit of seclusion to get away from it all, La Sagesse, Bathway and Levera Beach are the best hideaways with journeys that allow you to explore the countryside

Our historical sites and nature spots are never crowded. This allows you to take your time to enjoy the unspoiled natural surroundings and take in the fresh air. Adjust your body to island time and engage with locals at festivals and cultural celebrations, for our people are our biggest attractions.

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Juergen Thomas Steinmetz has continuously worked in the travel and tourism industry since he was a teenager in Germany (1979), beginning as a travel agent up through today as a publisher of eTurboNews (eTN), one of the world’s most influential and most-read travel and tourism publications. He is also Chairman of ICTP. His experiences include working and collaborating with various national tourism offices and non-governmental organizations, as well as private and non-profit organizations, and in planning, implementing, and quality control of a range of travel and tourism-related activities and programs, including tourism policies and legislation. His major strengths include a vast knowledge of travel and tourism from the point of view of a successful private enterprise owner, superb networking skills, strong leadership, excellent communication skills, strong team player, attention to detail, dutiful respect for compliance in all regulated environments, and advisory skills in both political and non-political arenas with respect to tourism programs, policies, and legislation. He has a thorough knowledge of current industry practices and trends and is a computer and Internet junkie.