Great news for tourists in Greece – instead of fleeing it became THE place to visit

Mixed with all current panic related to Greeks possible default and exit out of the EURO Zone, there is some good news emerging for foreign tourists vacationing in that country.

Great news for tourists in Greece – instead of fleeing it became THE place to visit

Mixed with all current panic related to Greeks possible default and exit out of the EURO Zone, there is some good news emerging for foreign tourists vacationing in that country.

Greece’s finance ministry announced that the strict ATM withdrawal limit of EURO 60.00 per day set late Sunday will not apply to holders of credit or debit cards issued in foreign countries.

This is excellent news for tourists. The tourism industry is also in a state of panic, but fully functioning. Prices are the lowest seen for a long time, but everything is changing to be on a cash only basis.

Greece is due to make a €1.6bn (£1.1bn) payment to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on Tuesday – the same day that its current bailout expires.

Greece risks default and moving closer to a possible exit from the eurozone.

Greeks have been queuing to withdraw money from cash machines over the weekend, and the Bank of Greece said it was making “huge efforts” to keep the machines stocked. Many tourists were found in line as well, what may have prompted the exception to the rule by authorities.

Greek banks are expected to stay shut until 7 July, two days after Greece’s planned referendum on the terms it had been offered by international creditors for receiving fresh bailout money.
The Athens stock exchange will also be closed on Monday.

Banks will be closed until July 8 as panic spreads among Greek citizens fearing their savings to be wiped out.

Businesses no longer accept credit cards worrying many tourists. The U.K. government had already plannes an evacuation of their citizens on holiday in Greece.

This may now not be necessary since money is readily available for visitors.

Greece is due to make a €1.6bn (£1.1bn) payment to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on Tuesday – the same day that its current bailout expires.

Greece risks default and moving closer to a possible exit from the eurozone.

Greeks have been queuing to withdraw money from cash machines over the weekend, and the Bank of Greece said it was making “huge efforts” to keep the machines stocked.

Greek banks are expected to stay shut until 7 July, two days after Greece’s planned referendum on the terms it had been offered by international creditors for receiving fresh bailout money.
The Athens stock exchange will also be closed on Monday.

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